Wednesday, December 14, 2005

Pedestrian Traffic vs. Vehicular

With all the talk about parking and Logan, it seems appropriate that we also report on pedestrian traffic, which has grown substantially in our neighborhood.

DDOT is currently exploring techniques to combat accidents and fatalities that happen on roads and sidewalks throughout the District. One of their experiments include pedestrians holding bright orange flags as they cross from corner to corner. In April, the Washington Post covered this experiment, and this week, the Washington Examiner did the same (see this article).

In terms of pedestrian fatalities (caused by vehicles) there is a 40 percent increase from last year. This is without adding bicycles into the mix. Walking around Logan, it's easy to see why. Traffic around the circle, up and down 15th Street, and even on P (between 14th & 15th) will keep any walker on their toes.

Until DDOT's experiments are concluded, and even then, it goes without saying that all pedestrians should stick to the sidewalk (even if it's more convenient to jaywalk from Whole Foods to Wachovia or Logan Tavern - and a lot of us have done it) and all drivers (especially those that are making turns) need to go slowly, and keep an eye out for pedestrians, cyclists, and even segways.

4 comments:

mike said...

My personal pet peeve is when cars are stopped in the crosswalk. Typically, they have VA or MD tags. Does anyone walk in the suburbs?

Anonymous said...

NO!!!

Chris K said...

I've noticed that when cars turn, they are speeding through to beat on-coming traffic, and therefore, are not paying attention to people in crosswalks.

The pet peeve that Mike mentions come from drivers who don't know what "blocking the box" means, and are trying to get through a light.

Anonymous said...

Another cause I see is the amount of work sites temporarily blocking the sidewalks (P at 14th, 13th etc.)which displace pedestrian traffic. All of these sites must have traffic control plans in place that will ensure pedestrian safety but many developers don't follow them or they erode over time as barricades are moved or signage deteriorates. Unfortunately d. doesn't keep the pressure on them to conform.